Study Suggests Plants Could Play an Even Bigger Role in Fighting Climate Change

3 months ago
Study Suggests Plants Could , Play an Even Bigger Role , in Fighting Climate Change.
'Newsweek' reports that research suggests
plants may be even better at removing carbon dioxide
from the atmosphere than previously believed. .
A new paper in the journal
'Science Advances' highlights the importance
of conserving plant life on Earth.
Plants take up a substantial amount of
carbon dioxide (CO2) every year, thereby
slowing down the detrimental effects
of climate change, but the extent to
which they will continue this CO2 uptake
into the future has been uncertain, Jürgen Knauer, environmental modeling researcher at Western
Sydney University and co-author of the paper, via 'Newsweek'.
What we found is that a well-established
climate model that is used to feed into global
climate assessments by the likes of the IPCC
predicts stronger and sustained carbon
uptake until the end of the 21st century when
extended to account for the impact of some
critical physiological processes that govern
how plants conduct photosynthesis, Jürgen Knauer, environmental modeling researcher at Western
Sydney University and co-author of the paper, via 'Newsweek'.
What we found is that a well-established
climate model that is used to feed into global
climate assessments by the likes of the IPCC
predicts stronger and sustained carbon
uptake until the end of the 21st century when
extended to account for the impact of some
critical physiological processes that govern
how plants conduct photosynthesis, Jürgen Knauer, environmental modeling researcher at Western
Sydney University and co-author of the paper, via 'Newsweek'.
The authors of the study modeled how plants would absorb
CO2 in a high-emission scenario, while accounting for
different levels of plant physiological processes. .
The authors of the study modeled how plants would absorb
CO2 in a high-emission scenario, while accounting for
different levels of plant physiological processes. .
We often think about climate models
as being all about physics, but biology
plays a huge role and it is something
that we really need to account for, Silvia Caldararu, assistant professor in climate
science at Trinity College Dublin, via 'Newsweek'.
These kinds of predictions have implications
for nature-based solutions to climate change
such as reforestation and afforestation and
how much carbon such initiatives can take up. , Silvia Caldararu, assistant professor in climate
science at Trinity College Dublin, via 'Newsweek'.
These kinds of predictions have implications
for nature-based solutions to climate change
such as reforestation and afforestation and
how much carbon such initiatives can take up. , Silvia Caldararu, assistant professor in climate
science at Trinity College Dublin, via 'Newsweek'.
Our findings suggest these approaches
could have a larger impact in mitigating
climate change and over a longer
time period than we thought, Silvia Caldararu, assistant professor in climate
science at Trinity College Dublin, via 'Newsweek'.
'Newsweek' reports that the authors of the study stress
the importance of current efforts to mitigate CO2
emissions and curb the impact of climate change.
'Newsweek' reports that the authors of the study stress
the importance of current efforts to mitigate CO2
emissions and curb the impact of climate change

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